(to) “Pop Up” vs (a) “Pop-Up”

(Idiomatic Prepositional Phrasal-Verb & Phrasal-Noun)


Popping Up - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


This Particular Tid-Bit is from the GiveMeSomeEnglish!!! – Lexis Portal and expanded here for Your English Learning Experience, and for the sake of The Proliferation Of Awesomeness, World-Wide…  which is, in fact, The Prime Objective of GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!)  😉


(a) “Pop-Up” = A terrible invention of internet marketers, used to annoy the hell out of us for the sake of business


The most common use of this term is in its Noun form, referring to those types of advertisements that appear suddenly on your computer screen, when you don’t have an ad blocker installed on your computer, or the error messages you get when you are not smart enough to finally get rid of Windows and switch to Linux already.


Error Subscribe - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!

(not a real “Pop-Up”)


In the Noun form, the term should be hyphenated to indicate that it is a “thing” rather than describing an action.  This is not a “rule” of English Grammar, but it is in The Common Tongue, because…  well… it just makes a hell-of-a-lot-of sense.  😎


(to) Pop Up = To suddenly appear; as if from out of nowhere, or in a very un-expected way.


In the Phrasal-Verb form, this can be used to refer to:


  • ideas
  • thoughts
  • images

An Idea Just Popped Up - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


These can be the ideas that seem to appear in one’s mind or imagination, sans actually having been consciously produced by the person intentionally.

The term can also be in reference to a situation occurring with no prior notice, and often coming as a bit of a surprise.


This could be things like…


  • A Meeting
  • An Un-Foreseen Obligation
  • A Demon Baby “Popping Up” Out Of It’s Stroller To Puke All Over The Place And Disturb Those Passing-By

Puking Demon Baby - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


As a final note, it should be mentioned that the Phrasal-Verb form is not nearly as common as the Phrasal-Noun form.  But when used in the Phrasal-Verb form, it is usually used in its separable form.  For example…


“The mighty warrior popped his head up, out of the safety of his shelter to see if the danger had passed.”


Popping Up - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


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The Man Known As “The Teacher” is the creator of – administrator for – and sole content contributor to – all that is GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!,  as well as a being a TEFL certified English teacher A Master of Ninja Invisibility and Jedi Mind Tricks, AND has a secret under-ground UFO bunker and Mad Scientist’s Laboratory hidden deep in The Balkans where he currently resides with his beautiful wife and the formerly-homeless monkeys that have infested his apartment.

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