The Grammatical Term, “Un-Countable Noun

Its Meaning and Usage In The Common Tongue Of The English Language


Grammar Steve - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!

“Ketchup” & “Mustard” are Un-Countable Nouns… Steven and his beard are not 😉


 Ia previous post, I explained what a Countable Noun is, and I also gave a brief explanation of Un-Countable Nouns (sometimes foolishly referred to as, “Non-Count Nouns.)  So now we’ll go more in-depth into that subject.


AUn-Countable Noun is a Noun that represents things which can not be counted as individual units.  These are things like liquids, or anything which would be very difficult to count as individual units.  They can also be abstract things like:  feelings, thoughts, emotions, or…


Pile Of Shit - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!

The word, “Pile” is a Countable Noun – where-as the word, “Shit” is an Un-Countable Noun.


To speak about Countable Nouns we can use Articles (a, an, & the), Numbers, and Direct or Indirect Pronouns (His, Her’s, This, That, etc.) in order to say, “how many”.


Noun Phrase - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


A monkey, ran up and pulled the dog’s tail, before running off, doing a loop around that tree, and finally going back to grab one of his legs.”


However, when we are speaking about Un-Countable Nouns we have to use some sort of unit of measure (a glass of…, a bottle of…, 750 ml of wine.)


Wine Pour - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


Or we can use some other Determiner (a Word which indicates specific information about the Noun) which is much less exact and may be different for each individual.


For Example:


Sand - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


“Do I have any sand on my face?”


Plenty Of Room - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


“Don’t worry, there’s plenty of room.”


A Significant Amount Of Pain - GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!


“I’m experiencing a significant amount of pain.”


Since Wine, Sand, Face, Room, and Pain are all Un-Countable Nouns – we use specific or general unit of measure a glass of, a bottle of, 750 ml of, or Determiners like any, my, plenty of, a significant amount of to say, “how much”, and/or “which one” of each thing.


For An Excellent Contrast Between Countable And Un-Countable Nouns, Watch The Video Below



Countable Nouns

One Man

A Big Smile

Three Hot-Dogs

A Few Hot-Dog Buns

About Four Or Five Lollipops

Only A Few Meatballs

A Million Little Sprinkles

And A Cherry

Un-Countable Nouns

A Bunch Of Cereal and Milk

A Huge Pile Of Ketchup & Mustard

Many Pieces Of Chopped Onion

A Bowl-Full Of Candy

A Monster Pile Of Spaghetti with Sauce

Some Big Chunks Of Parmesan Cheese

A Big Glop Of Chocolate Sauce

Some Ice-Cream

Some More Chocolate

A Bit Of Whipped Cream

 


And All That Means A Lot Of Awesomeness, Hilarity, And Joy!

(Three more Un-Countable Nouns)


Have An Excellent Day!

😉

 

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The Teacher

The Man Known As "The Teacher" is the creator of - administrator for - and sole content contributor to - all that is GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!,  as well as a being a TEFL certified English teacher A Master of Ninja Invisibility and Jedi Mind Tricks, AND has a secret under-ground UFO bunker and Mad Scientist's Laboratory hidden deep in The Balkans where he currently resides with his beautiful wife and the formerly-homeless monkeys that have infested his apartment. He is also a Gemini and so is his evil twin ;)

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4 Responses

  1. July 16, 2016

    […] than one variety of fish is to use a different sentence structure – like we would with an Un-Countable Noun (which the word “fish” actually can be in certain situations).  In a case like this […]

  2. July 22, 2016

    […] about Un-Countable Nouns in much more detail, you can view the post specifically about that topic HERE.  And to learn more Grammatical-Awesomeness here on GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!, Click […]

  3. July 27, 2016

    […] However, this time, what the speaker in the video is talking about is directly related to the two Grammar Lessons that we just finished, about Countable and Un-Countable Nouns. […]

  4. August 4, 2016

    […] Read The Full Post Here […]

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